Noah In Concert

Noah performing in concert

Noah Stewart, making his third appearance at Llangollen in four years, gave a full-voiced, vulnerable and credulous Don José. His interaction with Aldrich as they moved about the stage was one of the highlights of the performance for many of the 3,500-strong audience.
Daily Post

 

Inspirational tenor shows star quality to full house at Belfast’s Ulster Hall.Belfast Telegraph

 

Citizen of the world, delivered what had been promised – a refreshing musical treat with his wonderful tenor voice.Nations News

As Osaka (Mascagni’s Iris)

Mascagni’s Iris at Opera Holland Park

She is helped by the casting of the impossibly handsome American tenor Noah Stewart as Osaka, for in addition to singing a bunch of rhapsodic arias with rare grace, he also spends a fair amount of act two shirtless. What’s not to love? With Iris abducted, drugged and stripped near-naked, he mauls her body to the most sumptuous music.What’s on stage 

 

Noah Stewart’s tenor opened up well to reveal a nice, bright tone as Osaka, pressing his claims via Illica’s perfumed libretto: “Let my desire enter your veil” indeed! His Act II serenade “Apri la tua finestra” brimmed with ardour and he circled Iris in her cage like a panther.BachTrack

 

Noah Stewart delivers thrilling vocalism as the bullying Osaka
The Stage

 

Delightful in the Act One serenade, part of the puppet show, and during the long seduction scene in Act Two impressed with the long streams of gorgeous sound which he made, firm of line and rich of tone.
Planethuhill

As Don Pedro Alvarado (Indian Queen)

Peter Sellars' production of Purcell's Indian Queen

Noah Stewart as Don Pedro is magnificent.Daily Express

 

Noah Stewart ripped and stripped as Don Pedro and as handsome of voice as he is of physique.What’s on stage

 

Stewart, Excellent though underused.-The Arts Desk

 

There is singing of extraordinary eloquence by Lucy Crowe, Julia Bullock, Noah Stewart and Vince Yi
Evening Standard

As Faust (Faust)

Atlanta Opera's production of Gounod's Faust

Noah Stewart is probably the most talked-about young American tenor these days, so his casting in the title role was especially intriguing. With a ringing, unforced top and ample power, his dark-hued voice is ideal for the role of Faust. At his previous encounter with a Zambello production, as Radames in her 2012 Aida at the Glimmerglass Festival, Stewart was water-boarded (Zambello had updated things a tad from ancient Egypt). This time he was able to avoid torture, but Muller, the stage director, made effective use of his physical acting ability.Arts Atlanta

 

Noah Stewart (Faust) has a marvelous stage presence. The tenor flows through the music like a soft-edged knife through butter. The love duet with Marguerite (ending Act III) is wrapped up in a beautiful blend of two voices that is accompanied by Fagan’s case-sensitive orchestra; the moment is enrichingConcertonet.com

As Don Jose (Carmen)

Bizet's Carmen

Noah Stewart does put in an impressive turn, however, with an assured, vocally muscular Don José.Timeout

 

The Harlem-born tenor has a fine lyric voice that reaches the top notes and promises a starry future.Daily Express

 

A young black tenor from Harlem with a radiantly open sound – is a graceful Don Jose: when he later makes an unamplified re-entry through the stalls – before merging once more with the general sonic soup – one realises his vocal potentialIndependent

 

Noah Stewart played Don José and was a huge presence onstage Thursday night. A naturally gifted actor, he sang with a rich tenor voice that was both sweet and powerful when it needed to be.Nashville Arts

 

Stewart displayed his acting chops with great effect in Act III. Don José’s reaction to Escamillo’s declaration of love for Carmen was visceral, dramatic, and vocally evocative. – Nashville ArtsNashville Arts

As Pinkerton (Madama Butterfly)

Michigan Opera Theatre's production of Madama Butterfly

Noah Stewart’s beaming Pinkerton behaves as if money and rank can get him whatever he chooses. He’s like an excitable child in a toyshop, filled with delight at his new house and his new bride, whom he treats like an exotic purchase. Stewart is so physically engaging – young, attractive, smiling – that you feel reluctantly inclined to sympathise with him. He also knows how to act, and his voice is young enough, fresh enough to make him credible. There’s a lovely moment near the end of Act 1 when Anne Sophie Duprels’s Cio-Cio San slowly changes into her nightgown, and Stewart stands at the other side of the stage, nervously, excitedly smoking a cigarette. He’s an oaf with little respect or empathy for the culture which he’s buying into – but likeable for all that. The Arts Desk

 

This begins sublimely with the potent image of Butterfly ever so gently washing Pinkerton’s feet, which brings me to the exciting newcomer – the good looking young Harlem-born tenor Noah Stewart. Opera Britannia

 

Nor is Pinkerton the usual heartless bounder. As played by Noah Stewart he’s almost as naive as Butterfly. He has no idea of what he’s getting himself into, emotionally, culturally, or morally. And when the depth of Butterfly’s devotions is shockingly revealed, his immature response, focused wholly on his won feelings, seems utterly believable too. Stewart is a highly promising young American. I hope his new new recording contract with Decca doesn’t deflect him into mushy crossover projects. Good-looking with a rangy, volatile tenor, he has much to offer the serious opera world The Times

 

There are more forgiving roles – both morally and vocally – than the spineless Pinkerton, though the young American tenor Noah Stewart makes a compelling debut; the rich clarity of his tone and dashing persona seem capable of conquering anyone through sheer charisma alone. The Guardian

As Rodolfo (La Boheme)

Florentine Opera Company's production of Puccini's La Boheme

Perhaps the greatest performance of the night was that of Noah Stewart as Rodolfo. With an amazing vocal range and power. Examiner

 

The find of the night and leading that cast, as a virile and solid Rodolfo, was tenor Noah Stewart. A fine lyric tenor with an elegantly rounded tone, Stewart also has the heft and power in his voice to signal some of opera’s heavyweight roles in his future. That dark, rich timbre, along with Stewart’s fine acting, gave the character of the tempestuous lovelorn poet added depth. He maintained that powerful voice even in his ringing top notes. His rendition of “Che gelida manina” was an early showstopper.Times-Picuyane

 

Stewart’s Rodolfo was superb. Enthusiastic applause for the tenor literally stopped the show at several points. Stewart displayed incredible range and emotion, and his performances of “Marcello, Finalmente” and “Sono andati” were both truly memorable.NOLA Defender

 

Stewart’s tenor has a clarion edge to it that reminded me of Pavarotti in his glory days.Milwaukee Mag

 

Those fortunate enough to see and hear tenor Noah Stewart as Rodolfo will have bragging rights for years to come: “Oh yes, I saw him in his Nashville Opera debut,” they’ll say after his latest stop at Covent Garden (his 2012 debut there was critically acclaimed), the Met or La Scala. Think I’m overdoing my praise? Well, once you hear the mature grace, power and purity of Stewart’s voice throughout his range, see his acting ability and note his handsome form you’ll know I’m not. From the soulful eloquence of his Act I “Che gelida manina” aria to his anguished cry of “Mimì! Mimì!” at the finale Stewart pierced our hearts like love’s arrow from Cupid’s bow.Arts Nashville

As Romeo (Romeo & Juliet)

Knoxville Opera's production of Gounod's Romeo & Juliette

Stewart, who is seemingly everyone’s favorite up-and-coming tenor, comes off as an assuming vocal presence on first blush. But then his moment comes, and he truly unfurls his graceful tenor, a supple, golden thing that climbs and swoons. Sentinel

As Nadir (The Pearl Fishers)

Michigan Opera Theatre's production of Bizet's The Pearl Fishers

Noah Stewart, who debuted with a small role in “Nabucco” and has returned for several seasons in larger leading roles, triumphing in this opera, with his beautiful tenor voice floating effortlessly into a forceful, glowing top, a mature voice on its way to top tenordom. Encore

As Manrico (Il Trovatore)

Festival Opera's production of Verdi's Il Trovatore

The unassailable standout was young tenor Noah Stewart as Manrico, whose magnificent vocal gifts were in ready and unwavering supply throughout all four acts. His warm, nuances delivery of the “Ah, sib en mio” love pledge in Act III, followed mere moments by his scaling of heights of the fearsome “Di quella pira” cabaletta, were reason enough to be in the audience.Contracosta Times

 

The exception was tenor Noah Stewart, who impressed all evening in the title role. Assuming the first Manrico of his career, the former participant in the San Francisco Opera’s Merola and Adler fellowship programs was a sturdy, resonant hero. Stewart’s spinto voice is large, bright, muscular, and well-supported throughout his range.San Francisco Classical Voice

As The Prince (A Flowering Tree)

Chicago Opera's production of Adam's A Flowering Tree

Noah Stewart sustained the prince’s high-lying tenor part with heroic force and lyric tenderness.Chicago Tribune

 

With Noah Stewart’s “Prince”, I felt like we were experiencing an artist on the verge of a major career. He brought a regal bearing to the portrayal, and a polished, weight lyric voice with excellent thrust on the high phrases, and wonderful presence throughout thr range. Excellent diction, handsome good looks, beautiful instrument, wonderful musical instincts, sound technique, stage saavy, he’s got the goods.Opera Today

 

Handsome Noah Stewart (tenor, the prince) whose clarity of tone and crisp diction are impressive.The Windy City Times

As T. Morris Chester (Appomattox)

San Francisco Opera's production of Glass's Appomattox

Noah Stewart, a gifted young tenor as the courageous black journalist T. Morris Chester, were standouts.The New York Times

 

The only character as a matter of fact that undergoes a radical transformation is T. Morris Chester, in a stage stealing performance by Noah Stewart, singing with gut wrenching passion.Sfist San Francisco

 

The African American journalist T. Morris Chester (sung by Adler Fellow Noah Stewart in a brillant star turn) reports gleefully on the fall of Richmond. San Francisco Chronicle

 

Bravo to Noah Stewart whose seizing portrayal promises a fine career. Examiner

 

Tenor Noah Stewart sang spectacularly as the African American journalist (and eventual laywer) T. Morris Chester, displaying a beautiful, and sizable, lyric tenor.San Francisco Classical Voice

 

That role is sung by Noah Stewart, whose bold theatricality and supple voice give this intensely somber opera a sense of much- needed levity. SacBee

 

Noah Stewart made an urgent Chester.Oakland Tribune

 

…but the most outstanding performances come from Noah Stewart, as T. Morris Chester, a black journalist during the Civil War period.San Francisco Classical Voice

 

Noah Stewart had two soliloquies to deliver, the first euphoric, the second depairing, each equally immediate and vibrant.Opera News

 

Perhaps the best moment is that of the pristine clarion voice of Noah Stewart as Macolm, King of Scotland.Concertonet

As Malcolm (Macbeth)

San Francisco Opera's production of Verdi's Macbeth

Noah Stewart was an attractive, focused Malcolm.Opera News

 

It was another effective role for current Adler Fellow Noah Stewart, as the two former Adler Fellows ended the opera with their stirring duet with chorus. (Stewart should take note that exactly 50 years prior, San Francisco Opera’s Malcolm was Jess Thomas, so, from this small role was built one of the greatest heldentenor careers.) Opera Warhorses

 

Noah Stewart was a smooth-toned, resonant Malcolm. Oakland Tribune

 

…Tenor Noah Stewart as Malcolm, continues to outdo himself. San Francisco Chronicle

 

Noah Stewart made an impressive vocal and dramatic appearance as Malcolm. Examiner

As Prince Vodemont (Iolanta)

Bel Cantanti Opera's production of Tchaikovsky's Iolanta

Noah Stewart sang Vaudemont with full intensity. His Duet with Ezzie was the performance’s emotional high point.The Washington Post